DRAGINJA MASKARELI
Museum of Applied Art, Belgrade, Serbia
draginja.maskareli@mpu.rs

MUZEJ PRIMENJENE UMETNOSTI U BEOGRADU I POČECI MUZEALIZACIJE MODE U SRBIJI: Odsek za tekstil i kostim 1950–1980.
MUSEUM OF APPLIED ART IN BELGRADE AND THE BEGINNINGS OF FASHION MUSEOLOGY IN SERBIA: Department of Textile and Costume 1950–1980

Journal 13/2017 (Museum of Applied Art), pages 22-30

Article category: original scientific paper

UDC:
7.05:685.3]069.51(497.11)"1950/1980"
069.9:391(497.11)"1800/1914"

Abstract (original language):
Modne izložbe u velikim muzejskim centrima danas dobijaju status blokbastera, dok veliko interesovanje za muzealizaciju mode, koje vlada u domaćoj i međunarodnoj stručnoj javnosti, ukazuje na potrebu za istorizacijom ove oblasti. Rad prati i analizira ulogu Muzeja primenjene umetnosti u Beogradu u poč

Key words: (original language)
moda, muzejske kolekcije, istorija mode, muzealizacija mode, Muzej primenjene umetnosti u Beogradu

Summary:
Fashion exhibitions in large museum centres nowadays get the blockbuster status, whereas the great interest in including fashion in museums, which can be observed both among the local and international professional audiences, highlights the need for a historical analysis of this area of study. The study tracks and analyzes the role of the Museum of Applied Art in Belgrade in the earliest period of fashion museology in Serbia. The Museum of Applied Art was founded in 1950 as the first specialized museum of this type in Serbia. The Department of Textile and Costume was established on the same occasion. Its first curator was the art historian Dobrila Stojanović. Along with collection building and sistematization, during the first three decades, the activities of the Department of Textile and Costume included various exhibitions and accompanying programmes. The first thematic museum exhibition dedicated to fashion in Serbia, Women's Fashion from the mid- 19th Century until the 1930s, was organized in 1966.

Over the years, the Department's fashion collection was supplied with new items through purchase and gifts. The acquisitions included clothing items such as gowns, cloaks, underwear and suits, as well as various accessories: caps, hats, head adornments, footwear, belts, bags, umbrellas, handkerchiefs, walking sticks or business card boxes. The acquisition policy was primarily focused on the items of Serbian provenance, although the collection also included objects from other regions and cultures. This period was completed and closed in 1980 by a major study exhibition curated by Dobrila Stojanović – Urban Dress in Serbia in the 19th and Early 20th Century. Together with the extensive exhibition catalogue, it is still a reference point for further study of the history of Serbian fashion. From today's perspective, it can be concluded that the Museum achieved significant results in this pioneering work, providing a solid foundation for the modern development of museology in general and particularly fashion museology.

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